Testing services for burglary resistance

We determine the burglar resistance of windows and doors to static or dynamic loading as well as manual attack.

Security is a key issue for doors and windows. There are clear rules at European level governing the requirements for burglar-resistant windows and doors. We advise and support you in selecting the window and door constructions to be tested, in obtaining the CE marking and in meeting the requirements of SIA 331 and SIA 343.

Range of services

Most of the testing performed is accredited to ISO/IEC 17025 by the Swiss Accreditation Service (SAS), accreditation number: STS 317. The SAS is a member of the International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation (ILAC). This means that the tests accredited by us are recognised internationally.

We test to the following standards:

  • Burglar resistance: Requirements and classification (EN 1627*, SIA 343.201*)
  • Test method for the determination of resistance to static loading (EN 1628*, SIA 343.202*)
  • Test method for the determination of resistance to dynamic loading (EN 1629*, SIA 343.203*)
  • Test method for the determination of resistance to manual attack (EN 1630*, SIA 343.204*)
  • Product standard, performance characteristics (EN 14351-1)
  • Special security glazing – Testing and classification of resistance against manual attack (EN 356)
  • Building hardware – Lever handles and knob furniture – Requirements and test methods (EN 1906)
  • Building hardware – Cylinders for locks – Requirements and test methods (EN 1303)
  • Building hardware – Locks - Mechanically operated locks and locking plates – Requirements and test methods (EN 12209)

* tests accredited by the Swiss Accreditation Service (SAS)

All orders are carried out by qualified specialists from the relevant field and are treated confidentially.

Resistance classes of burglary resistance

The requirements for windows, doors and shutters are divided into six different resistance classes in the EN 1627 standard.

The occasional burglar attempts to gain access using simple small tools and physical force, e.g. by kicking, using a shoulder, lifting or ripping out. Typically, it is an opportunistic burglar who has no specific information about the resistance level of the building product, has little time and avoids noise. He has no specific knowledge about the likely haul and is only slightly willing to take risks.

The casual burglar additionally attempts to force entry with simple tools, such as screwdrivers, pliers, wedges, and using small handsaws on window bars or exposed strips. The use of drill-protected locking cylinders renders simple mechanical drilling tools in the tool set ineffective. Typically, it is an opportunistic burglar who has little information about the likely resistance level of the building product, has little time and avoids noise. He has no specific knowledge about the likely haul and is only slightly willing to take risks.

The burglar attempts to gain access with the help of a crowbar, an additional screwdriver and hand tools such as a small hammer, pin punch and a mechanical drill. By using the crowbar, the burglar is able to exert greater force. The drilling tool can be used to attack vulnerable locking devices. Typically, it is an opportunistic burglar who has some specific information about the possible degree of resistance of the building product and has to consider both time and noise. He has no specific knowledge about the likely haul and is prepared to take limited risks.

The experienced burglar additionally uses a heavy-duty hammer, an axe, chisels and a portable battery-powered drill. The heavy-duty hammer, axe and drill give the burglar a wider range of attack possibilities. The burglar is expecting a good haul and is presumably determined to force entry. He is also less worried about the noise he causes and more willing to take a higher risk.

The very experienced burglar additionally uses power tools, e.g. electric drill/hole saw/jigsaw and an angle grinder with a disc of max. 125mm diameter. The use of an angle grinder further increases the range of potentially successful attack methods at his disposal. The burglar is expecting a good haul, is determined to force entry and is well prepared. He is not particularly worried about the noise he causes and is willing to take a high risk.

The very experienced burglar additionally uses a splitting maul, heavy-duty power tools, e.g. electric drill/hole saw/jigsaws and an angle grinder with a disc of max. 230mm diameter. The tools can be handled by a single person, are very powerful and potentially very effective. The burglar expects a correspondingly large haul, is determined to force entry and is very well prepared. He is not worried about the noise he causes and is willing to take significant risks.

* With RC1N and RC2N there are no requirements for the glazing at the installation location. However, it is advisable to install these components only where they are difficult for a criminal to access. Recommendation: at least 3m above and 1m to the side of a surface that can be used to stand on. For the test, however, a laminated safety glass of class P4A according to EN 356 must be installed.